The Federalist Papers

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The Federalist Papers, a collection of 85 essays, were published in series between October 27th, 1787, and May 28th, 1788, in New York. At first, the essays were called The Federalist. The authors Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay wrote under the alias “Publius.” Hamilton is the author of 51 essays, Madison of 29, Jay of 5.

The Americans drafted and later ratified a new constitution between 1787 and 1788. Hamilton, Madison, and Jay were all in favor of it. Therefore, they wrote articles to support it. The three authors are all among The Founding Fathers of the USA.

The authors argue in two ways. First, they try to explain the advantages of the proposed federal system. The system will maintain justice, stability, and liberty. Only a large republic can achieve this. On the other hand, they also admit some difficulties.

The Federalist Papers
The Federalist Papers by Madison, Hamilton, and Jay

They also point out problems in the Articles of Confederation. They find them weak and defective. Furthermore, the book also explains the constitution. Thus, the implementation was more straightforward. 

Moreover, the authors were against the Bill of Rights. Hamilton argued that people could interpret it as the ONLY rights people have. However, others believed such a bill is necessary. In 1791, two years after the constitution, the United States ratified the Bill of Rights.

Importance of The Federalist Papers

At first, The Federalist Papers tried to persuade New Yorkers to support the constitution. However, the actual impact on the ratification itself is unknown. Nevertheless, it gained fame soon. As a book, it was published for the first time already in 1788. Since then, it became a part of the US education system. The book helps millions understand the US government. Moreover, it is also significant for the interpretation of the law by courts. Thus, it is one of the most notable documents in the USA.